Arm and Hand Stroke Exercises Using Mental Practice

NeuroRehab Team
Monday, May 16th, 2016


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A stroke is the rapid loss of brain function(s) due to disturbance in the blood supply to the brain. When you have an ischemic stroke, there is an interruption, or reduction, of the blood supply. Eighty percent of all strokes occur due to ischemia. With a hemorrhagic stroke, there is bleeding in the brain. After about 4 minutes without blood and oxygen, brain cells become damaged and may die. When brain cells are damaged or die, the body parts controlled by those cells cannot function. The loss of function may be mild or severe and temporary or permanent. This depends on where and how much of the brain is damaged and how fast the blood supply can be returned to the affected cells.

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Improve Hand Function After Stroke

NeuroRehab Team
Tuesday, April 26th, 2016


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It is not uncommon for individuals to experience decreased hand function and strength following a neurological injury such as stroke. Sadly, even after 6 months following stroke, over 60% of clients are still struggling to achieve full arm and hand recovery (Kwakkel et al., 2003). Moreover, the inability to actively open the hand for pre-grasp activities is a severe limitation for many stroke survivors.  The impaired movements lead to decreased independence in leisure and self-care tasks (activities of daily living). Because this limited function is a difficult challenge, traditionally, clients were required to relearn new compensatory movement patterns and one-handed strategies so functional activities could be achieved.

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Mirror Therapy Exercises for Improving Arm and Hand Function After Stroke

NeuroRehab Team
Thursday, April 21st, 2016


 

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Mirror therapy, a treatment technique first described by V.S. Ramachandran for phantom limb pain following amputation, is a form of motor imagery in which a mirror is used to process visual feedback about motor performance of the unaffected body part as it performs various movements. It is primarily used to speed up and improve motor function after stroke and other neurological disorders.

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Understanding Stroke Exercise Treatment and Technology

NeuroRehab Team
Friday, April 15th, 2016


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While in therapy, it is not uncommon for patients and family members to enhance their rehab vocabulary from daily conversations with the clinical team. From the early moments of their arrival, they are immediately bombarded with clinical “whatchamacallits” from physicians, nurses, and therapists. Although the learning curve can be quite challenging, for many it is achievable thanks to Google and Yahoo.

Unfortunately, once the clinical jargon is finally mastered, the patients are preparing for their discharge date that is typically around the corner. It is not until their discharge week that they begin to have serious discussions with their occupational and physical therapists about what exercises to do at home and various equipment that might be needed.

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Shoulder Subluxation Following Stroke and Other Neurological Injuries

NeuroRehab Team
Thursday, April 7th, 2016


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Stroke is a major cause of disability in the world. Significant impairment in the affected arm can be seen roughly between 30 and 70% of individuals suffering from stroke (Kwakkel et al., Lancet, 1999). One of the most common areas often affected by a neurological injury is the glenohumeral joint (i.e., shoulder). The shoulder complex is a very sophisticated and complicated joint in the body. It consists of 20 muscles, 3 bones, 3 joints, and 1 articulation. It has the greatest ROM of any joint in the body but at the expense of stability.

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Stroke Rehab Exercise Equipment. Where do I Start?

NeuroRehab Team
Monday, March 28th, 2016


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As if learning to adjust to a new life following a stroke or neurological injury is not difficult enough, finding a home exercise program and appropriate stroke/neuro therapy equipment can be equally daunting. Assuming a therapist is up-to-date with current stroke research and latest technology available (could be a big assumption), there is a good chance that he or she will recommend exercises and products that will be meaningful to the client.

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Stroke Shoulder Pain and Stiffness

NeuroRehab Team
Tuesday, March 22nd, 2016


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Shoulder pain is a common complication after stroke. Up to 72% of stroke patients develop hemiplegic shoulder pain. It may occur in up to 80% of stroke patients who have little or no voluntary movement of the affected upper limb. Painful stroke shoulder can negatively affect rehab outcomes as adequate shoulder function is a prerequisite for hand function, ADL’s, and functional mobility.

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Vision Recovery Following Stroke

NeuroRehab Team
Thursday, March 17th, 2016


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Approximately 30% of all stroke patients suffer from post-stroke visual impairment (Sand KM. Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 2013). Following a stroke or other neurological injuries, various types of vision deficits can occur including the inability to recognize objects, color vision deficits and difficulty with perceiving various types of motion. Approximately 20% experience permanent visual deficits (Romano JG. J of Neurol Sci. 2008). According to the National Stroke Association homonymous hemianopia, which is the loss of one half of the visual field in each eye, is the most common visual disorder.

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Are You Safe To Drive Following a Stroke?

NeuroRehab Team
Monday, March 7th, 2016


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Driving is often a major concern following a neurological injury.  Movements, sensations, alertness, judgement, coordination, and vision can be adversely affected which may impair the ability to drive a car. Due to these impairments, there is cause for concern regarding increased risk of crashes post stroke and other neurological injuries (Perrier et al., 2010).

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Mobility and Leg Recovery Following Stroke and Other Neurological Injuries

NeuroRehab Team
Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016


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One of the most common impairments resulting from stroke is paralysis, which can affect a portion or the entire side of the body. Problems with body posture, walking, and balance can be significant. Two thirds of the patients are unable to walk without assistance in the first week after stroke (Jorgensen HS et al. Arch Phys Med Rehabil, 1995). Approximately 35% of survivors with initial paralysis of the leg do not regain useful walking function (Hendricks HT et al. Arch Phys Med Rehabil, 2002). Although 65% to 85% of stroke survivors learn to walk independently by 6 months post stroke, gait abnormalities and poor endurance persists through the chronic stages of the condition (Wade DT et al. Scand J Rehabil Med, 1987).

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Arm and Hand Recovery Following Stroke and Other Neurological Injuries

NeuroRehab Team
Friday, February 26th, 2016


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The latest research shows that the brain is capable of rewiring and adapting after stroke. Therefore, arm and hand recovery is more possible than previously thought. However, in order to improve function in the upper limb, the client must be willing to incorporate the affected side purposefully, functionally, and repeatedly. In addition to functional training, other beneficial strategies include strength training, mental imagery, robotics, and gravity compensation.

Below are the key takeaway’s that highlight the current thinking from the scientific community.

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Stroke Overview and Recovery – Key Facts

NeuroRehab Team
Thursday, February 25th, 2016


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What is a Stroke?

 

A stroke, or cerebrovascular accident (CVA), is the rapid loss of brain function(s) due to disturbance in the blood supply to the brain. When you have an ischemic stroke, there is an interruption, or reduction, of the blood supply. Eighty percent of all strokes occur due to ischemia. With a hemorrhagic stroke, there is bleeding in the brain. After about 4 minutes without blood and oxygen, brain cells become damaged and may die. When brain cells are damaged or die, the body parts controlled by those cells cannot function. The loss of function may be mild or severe and temporary or permanent. This depends on where and how much of the brain is damaged and how fast the blood supply can be returned to the affected cells.

Read more…

NeuroRehab Directory Launches the World’s Largest Non-Biased Platform to Connect Patients and Health Professionals with Neurological Rehabilitation Products and Resources.

NeuroRehab Team
Wednesday, February 24th, 2016


New online directory collects reviews from users so people can make decisions based on real feedback.

 

NeuroRehab Directory announces today the official launch of www.neurorehabdirectory.com, a new non-biased website dedicated to assisting patients, families and health professionals with identifying appropriate neurorehab solutions and resources.

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Welcome to the NeuroRehab Directory

NeuroRehab Team
Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016


Our free online website connects patients, families and health professionals with neurological rehabilitation products programs. We make it easy to find NeuroRehab solutions in an impartial way. Viewers can drill down their choices by selecting impairment, product category, price, and/or body part. To keep product companies honest, we collect reviews from actual users so individuals can make the best decision based on real feedback.

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