Pain After Stroke

Dorothee Zuleger, MOT, OTR/L, ATRIC
Monday, May 21st, 2018


Central Pain Syndrome (CPS) is a dysfunction of the pain-conducting pathways of the central nervous system (CNS). The CNS includes the brain, brain stem, and spinal cord. CPS occurs when there is damage to an area of the brain that carries lots of sensory pathways.

 

People often experience CPS as the result of a stroke, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, or spinal cord injury. CPS is commonly referred to as neuropathic pain or sometimes as thalamic pain syndrome by medical professionals.

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Recent Study Highlights the Importance of Electrical Stimulation for Spasticity Treatment Following Stroke

NeuroRehab Team
Saturday, April 21st, 2018


 

A recent randomized trial by Yuzer et al., in the Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases 2017, investigated the effects of functional electrical stimulation of the wrist and finger extensor muscles of patients with chronic stroke who had spasticity of their wrist flexors.

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Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) May Help Stroke Survivors Improve Recovery

NeuroRehab Team
Tuesday, March 27th, 2018


 

Anyone who’s done physical or occupational therapy knows how hard it is not to cheat. The body wants to get back to work, and the easiest way to do that is to use the uninjured limbs to help out. The therapist is there to make sure it’s the injured limb that’s doing the work.

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Intensive Arm Exercises After Stroke Improves Strength and Function

NeuroRehab Team
Wednesday, January 17th, 2018


Intensive therapy can help people who have suffered a stroke recover motor function—even if the treatment begins a year or more after the stroke occurred. After a stroke, the brain and body can start recovering immediately and can show improvement up to six months afterward.

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Improve Functional Mobility With Lower Extremity Stroke Technology

NeuroRehab Team
Tuesday, December 26th, 2017


One of the most common impairments resulting from stroke is paralysis, which can affect a portion or the entire side of the body. Problems with body posture, walking, and balance can be significant. A patient’s rehabilitation should start as soon as he or she is stable. That could be anywhere from a couple of days to a few weeks or longer. Established guidelines, as well as a huge body of literature, insist that the earlier therapy is initiated the better.

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10 Must-Try Mirror Therapy Exercises

NeuroRehab Team
Thursday, October 5th, 2017


The principle of Mirror Therapy is the use of a mirror to create a reflective illusion of an affected limb in order to trick the brain into thinking movement has occurred. Mirror therapy allows the brain to be activated during the imitation movements and interact simultaneously with the motor neurons. For example, if you put your left hand behind a mirror and right hand in front, you can trick your brain into believing that the reflection of your right hand in the mirror is your left. You are now exercising your left hand in the brain!

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Stroke Hand Treatment Using Biofeedback Electrical Stimulation

NeuroRehab Team
Monday, September 4th, 2017


Activities of Daily Living (ADL) are impacted continuously for may stroke survivors that suffer from limited arm and hand function and movement. Research indicates that Biofeedback and Electrical Stimulation can result in improved mobility and functional use. Biofeedback combined with electrical stimulation (NMES or FES) can be an effective tool in reducing the symptoms of stroke, such as increasing strength and function.

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Best Electrode Position and Placement for Leg and Foot Stroke Rehabilitation

NeuroRehab Team
Friday, March 24th, 2017


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Electrical stimulation, also referred to as e-stim, NMES, or FES, can be an effective tool in reducing the symptoms of stroke, such as increasing strength and function. The success of one’s recovery using electrical stimulation will rely heavily on proper electrode placement.

Listed below are some key video examples of lower limb electrode positioning by Axelgaard. Click on the thumbnail below to visit the video link.

 

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What is Electrical Stimulation? Advances in Stroke Treatment.

NeuroRehab Team
Friday, December 2nd, 2016


 

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Electrical stimulation, also referred to as e-stim, NMES, or FES, can be an effective tool in reducing the symptoms of stroke, such as increasing strength and function. The success of one’s recovery using electrical stimulation will rely heavily on proper electrode placement.

Read more…

Wearable Stroke Technology Puts Patient Back in Control

NeuroRehab Team
Tuesday, October 11th, 2016


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According to new research published in the American Heart Association journal Stroke, researchers at the MetroHealth System, Case Western Reserve University, and the Cleveland Functional Electrical Stimulation Center have developed a glove that allows patients be in control of the stimulation to their weak hand.

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Where to find Shoulder Subluxation Treatment Options?

NeuroRehab Team
Tuesday, September 20th, 2016


 

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One of the most common areas often affected by a neurological injury is the glenohumeral joint (i.e., shoulder). The shoulder complex is a very sophisticated and complicated joint in the body. It consists of 20 muscles, 3 bones, 3 joints, and 1 articulation. It has the greatest ROM of any joint in the body but at the expense of stability.

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Foot Drop Following Stroke. What are the Treatment Options?

NeuroRehab Team
Friday, July 15th, 2016


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The National Institute of Neurological Disorders defines foot drop, also known as dropped foot or drop foot, as “the inability to raise the front part of the foot due to weakness or paralysis of the muscles that lift the foot.” Consequentially, people who have foot drop scuff their toes along the ground; they may also bend their knees to lift their foot higher than usual to avoid the scuffing, which causes what is called a “steppage” gait.

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Best Electrode Placement For Arm and Hand Stroke Rehabilitation

NeuroRehab Team
Tuesday, July 5th, 2016


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Electrical stimulation, also referred to as e-stim, NMES, or FES, can be an effective tool in reducing the symptoms of stroke, such as increasing strength and function. The success of one’s recovery using electrical stimulation will rely heavily on proper electrode placement.

Listed below are some key video examples of upper limb electrode positioning by Axelgaard. Click on the thumbnail below to visit the video link.

 

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Hand Mobility Exercises and Stretches Following a Stroke

NeuroRehab Team
Thursday, June 16th, 2016


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The latest research shows that the brain is capable of reorganizing after a stroke. Therefore, arm and hand recovery is more possible than previously thought. However, in order to improve function in the upper extremity, the client must be willing to incorporate the affected side purposefully, functionally, and repeatedly.

Listed below are 2 good videos that review simple ways to stretch and exercise the affected hand and fingers.

 

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Shoulder Subluxation Following Stroke and Other Neurological Injuries

NeuroRehab Team
Thursday, April 7th, 2016


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Stroke is a major cause of disability in the world. Significant impairment in the affected arm can be seen roughly between 30 and 70% of individuals suffering from stroke (Kwakkel et al., Lancet, 1999). One of the most common areas often affected by a neurological injury is the glenohumeral joint (i.e., shoulder). The shoulder complex is a very sophisticated and complicated joint in the body. It consists of 20 muscles, 3 bones, 3 joints, and 1 articulation. It has the greatest ROM of any joint in the body but at the expense of stability.

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Mobility and Leg Recovery Following Stroke and Other Neurological Injuries

NeuroRehab Team
Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016


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One of the most common impairments resulting from stroke is paralysis, which can affect a portion or the entire side of the body. Problems with body posture, walking, and balance can be significant. Two thirds of the patients are unable to walk without assistance in the first week after stroke (Jorgensen HS et al. Arch Phys Med Rehabil, 1995). Approximately 35% of survivors with initial paralysis of the leg do not regain useful walking function (Hendricks HT et al. Arch Phys Med Rehabil, 2002). Although 65% to 85% of stroke survivors learn to walk independently by 6 months post stroke, gait abnormalities and poor endurance persists through the chronic stages of the condition (Wade DT et al. Scand J Rehabil Med, 1987).

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Arm and Hand Recovery Following Stroke and Other Neurological Injuries

NeuroRehab Team
Friday, February 26th, 2016


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The latest research shows that the brain is capable of rewiring and adapting after stroke. Therefore, arm and hand recovery is more possible than previously thought. However, in order to improve function in the upper limb, the client must be willing to incorporate the affected side purposefully, functionally, and repeatedly. In addition to functional training, other beneficial strategies include strength training, mental imagery, robotics, and gravity compensation.

Below are the key takeaway’s that highlight the current thinking from the scientific community.

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