Stroke Hand Treatment Using Biofeedback Electrical Stimulation

NeuroRehab Team
Monday, September 4th, 2017


Activities of Daily Living (ADL) are impacted continuously for may stroke survivors that suffer from limited arm and hand function and movement. Research indicates that Biofeedback and Electrical Stimulation can result in improved mobility and functional use. Biofeedback combined with electrical stimulation (NMES or FES) can be an effective tool in reducing the symptoms of stroke, such as increasing strength and function.

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How to Improve Hand Function Following a Stroke

NeuroRehab Team
Thursday, June 1st, 2017


 

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It is not uncommon for individuals to experience decreased hand function and strength following a neurological injury such as stroke. Sadly, even after 6 months following stroke, over 60% of clients are still struggling to achieve full arm and hand recovery (Kwakkel et al., 2003). Moreover, the inability to actively open the hand for pre-grasp activities is a severe limitation for many stroke survivors.  The impaired movements lead to decreased independence in leisure and self-care tasks (activities of daily living). Because this limited function is a difficult challenge, traditionally, clients were required to relearn new compensatory movement patterns and one-handed strategies so functional activities could be achieved.

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Hand Mobility Exercises and Stretches Following a Stroke

NeuroRehab Team
Thursday, June 16th, 2016


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The latest research shows that the brain is capable of reorganizing after a stroke. Therefore, arm and hand recovery is more possible than previously thought. However, in order to improve function in the upper extremity, the client must be willing to incorporate the affected side purposefully, functionally, and repeatedly.

Listed below are 2 good videos that review simple ways to stretch and exercise the affected hand and fingers.

 

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Improve Hand Function After Stroke

NeuroRehab Team
Tuesday, April 26th, 2016


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It is not uncommon for individuals to experience decreased hand function and strength following a neurological injury such as stroke. Sadly, even after 6 months following stroke, over 60% of clients are still struggling to achieve full arm and hand recovery (Kwakkel et al., 2003). Moreover, the inability to actively open the hand for pre-grasp activities is a severe limitation for many stroke survivors.  The impaired movements lead to decreased independence in leisure and self-care tasks (activities of daily living). Because this limited function is a difficult challenge, traditionally, clients were required to relearn new compensatory movement patterns and one-handed strategies so functional activities could be achieved.

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Arm and Hand Recovery Following Stroke and Other Neurological Injuries

NeuroRehab Team
Friday, February 26th, 2016


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The latest research shows that the brain is capable of rewiring and adapting after stroke. Therefore, arm and hand recovery is more possible than previously thought. However, in order to improve function in the upper limb, the client must be willing to incorporate the affected side purposefully, functionally, and repeatedly. In addition to functional training, other beneficial strategies include strength training, mental imagery, robotics, and gravity compensation.

Below are the key takeaway’s that highlight the current thinking from the scientific community.

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